The best ever Chicken fried steak comfort food recipe for dinner from Daddy Jack’s New London CT

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  1. Daddy Jack! Thank you for this video! I took your advice and used Ribeyes and it was amazing! Love your videos, they have sparked a meal cooking fire within me and i now really enjoy cooking new and tasty recipies. You are much appreciated!

  2. That's NOT how it's done in TEXAS !!! Take a look at Cowboy Kent Rollins Videos . He's a working Cowboy and Chuck Wagon Chef from OK and he will show you all up there in YANKEE land how to make Real Country Gravy and Chicken Fried Steak the OK & TX way which is the BEST way !!!

  3. Chicken-Fried Steak* The winding down of summer puts me in a heavy philosophical mood. I am thinking about the deep, very private personal needs of people. Needs that when met give us a great sense of well-being. We don’t like to talk about these for fear that people will not understand. But to increase our level of intimacy, I will tell you about one of mine: chicken-fried steak.
    If you have any idea what’s good, you already know you Take a piece of stringy beef and pound hell out of it with a kitchen sledge, dip it in egg and flour, drop it in a skillet with bacon drippings, and fry it up. Then you take it out, throw in some flour and milk and salt and pepper, and you got serious gravy. On the plate with the steak you lay peas and mashed potatoes, and then dump on the gravy. Some cornbread and butter and a quart of cold milk on the side. Then you take knife and fork in hand, hunker down close to the trough, lift your eyes heavenward in praise of the wonders of the Lord, and don’t stop until you’ve mopped up the last trace of gravy with the last piece of cornbread. Disgusting, you say. Sure, but you probably eat something that stands for home and happiness that I wouldn’t approach without a Geiger counter and a bomb squad. It’s okay. You eat yours and I’ll eat mine. We could do worse. Now everybody has some secret goals in life. And I’ve kind of been keeping my eye out for the ultimate chicken-fried-steak experience. You have to look in truck stops and little country towns off the freeway. Little temples of the holy meal out there in the underbrush. If you’re interested, this summer’s search produced these results: One Star to the Torres Bar and Grill in Weiser, Idaho – free toothpicks, too. Two Stars to the Farewell Bend Café in Farewell Bend, Oregon – with special praise for the side of “Graveyard Stew,” which is milk toast, and that’s another story. Two Stars to the Blue Bucket in Umatilla, Oregon – free mints afterward. Three Stars to the Roostertail Truck Stop on Sixth Avenue South in Seattle – the waitress used to drive a truck In Alabama, and she knows all about chicken-fried steak. FIVE STARS and a bouquet to Maud Owens’ Café in Payette, Idaho, where the chicken-fried steak hangs over the edge of the plate and is accompanied by parsley, a spiced peach, two dill pickles, and a fried egg. And free toothpicks AND free mints. And a map of Payette under the plate. The manager shook my hand when I left Maud Owens’ Café. The waitress gave me a kiss on the cheek. I left her a two-dollar tip. I don’t think anybody had ever eaten the whole thing before. I could still taste it three days later. Now I suppose you are wondering why on earth I am telling all this. Well, I get tired of hearing it’s a crummy world and the people are no damned good. What kind of talk is that? I know a place in Payette, Idaho, where a cook and a waitress and a manager put everything they’ve got into laying a chicken-fried steak on you. The Rolling Stones are famous for their phrase about how you can’t always get what you want but sometimes you get what you need. Well, I’m here to tell you that sometimes you can get what you want and what you need at the same time, with free toothpicks and mints, and a kiss for topping! * Robert Fulghum does not title his essays. Page 53
     
    All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things, Robert Fulghum (C) 1986, 1988 by Robert L. Fulghum

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